Posts Tagged ‘Secularization’

A Matter of Principle

Friday, December 5th, 2008

I was reading an article from the Charlotte Observer about UNC forgoing Christmas trees or any other Christmas decorations in their libraries this year, ostensibly because some staff were offended by the display.

So I have two questions:

  1. What particular religion claims the Christmas tree as a sacred part of its religious observance of Christmas?  Seems to me like a Christmas tree is an entirely secular celebration.  So shouldn’t it be equally offensive to Christians that it becomes the focus of the holiday?  Or should we all just realize that it’s part of our “American culture” and go with the flow?
  2. As a matter of principle, shouldn’t the people who are offended by Christmas and Christmas-related displays, decorations, and parties, also be offended at the vacation day provided on Christmas?  If you’re honestly offended, I’d expect that you would refuse to take the day off, because in so doing, you’re selling out to “the man” who’s pushing Christmas down our throats.

The Secular Message of American Christianity

Friday, November 21st, 2008

Michael Horton (Christless Christianity, p. 49ff) mentions sociologist Marsha Witten’s analysis of the secularization of American churches (All is Forgiven: The Secular Message in American Protestantism).  Ms. Witten recalls listening to Bach’s St. Matthew Passion, when the mail arrived with a promotional flyer for a new church: “Why not get a LIFT instead of a letdown this Sunday?”

Witten uses this juxtaposition — St. Matthew Passion vs. the flyer — to frame the conclusions of her study.  As Horton summarizes:

While the former is fed by a rich sense of God’s majesty, holiness, and mercy, as well as the genuine struggle of faith, the latter is “optimistic, untroubled, purely mundane,” like any other advertisement for a product.  American Christianity today lives in this contradiction between “the spiritual and the psychological, the transcendent and the pragmatic.”