Posts Tagged ‘Bible’

Best Bible Ever

Thursday, April 14th, 2011

Cambridge Pitt Minion ESV Bible

I’m picky when it comes to Bibles. Binding has to be good, cover has to be perfect, margins can’t be too small, font can’t be some stupid modern nonsense, and the paper can’t be too thin or transparent. So this is just a quick note to plug an amazing good Bible, the Cambridge Pitt Minion.  You can even pick from major translations: mine is the ESV, my sister’s is the NIV, and there are also NKJV, NASB, and NLT options available.

Having used this as my primary Bible for two and a half years, I have to say this is the absolute best Bible I’ve ever owned. Quality leather that feels and looks nice and handles well. Sewn binding that is strong and permits the Bible to lay open flat (without holding) pretty much from beginning to end. Clear and crisp text, nice formatting and layout. The Bible has held up excellently.

One caveat for the potential buyer is that it is smaller than one might expect. I’m young, I can afford small text. But if somebody made this Bible just like it is, only 25% larger, I’d jump for it in a heartbeat.

I’m not getting paid for a review. I just really like my Bible!

CNN’s anti-Christian Bias?

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

Codex SinaiticusJust read an article on CNN (“Oldest known Bible goes online“) about the online unveiling of the Codex Sinaiticus. This particular article is misleading as to the particulars of the difference between the ancient codex and modern Bibles, and demonstrates a complete lack of understanding on the subject (or significant anti-Christian bias) by its author.

To have apocryphal books present in an ancient codex is not unusual, nor unexpected; most of the books mentioned indeed are still present in Bibles that you can buy from the bookstore. They aren’t missing, they aren’t seditionary — but it seems the article is trumped up to make excitement that everything you thought you knew about the Bible isn’t true!

The discussion about changes and corrections in the codex does not include any thought as to whether the changes were corrections towards the accepted text or deviations from it; the part about missing passages doesn’t bother to mention whether the omissions are due to missing pages or damage or were never written.

There is also no discussion of the possible theological bent of the monastery where this was copied, which could have led the scribes to change it for their purposes (see the Jefferson Bible, for instance).

I don’t expect a news reporter to spout the standard Christian doctrine, but I do expect a discussion that respects and represents the nuance of the subject in question. And the fact that they would never write an article like this about the Koran reinforces the possibility that this is, plain and simple, anti-Christian bias.

Bad journalism, bad scholarship, and patently offensive besides. CNN, you’ve done it again!

Testing a New Plugin

Thursday, October 30th, 2008

So I just downloaded and installed my first WordPress plugin, and I need to test it out.  The plugin is RefTagger from Logos Bible Software, which should automatically put a pop-up link on any Scripture references that I use in my blog posts.

So let’s give it a try.  Yesterday, I commented on Facebook about a statment by Archbishop Tutu of South Africa:

“God says, ‘Help me. Help me. Help me make this world the kind of world I intended for it to be. Help me. Help me so I can make this world more compassionate. Help me. Help me to make this a world that is more caring. Help me, help me, please help me, to make this world a world where there will be no poverty; where my children won’t spend as much as they do on weapons of destruction, and would spend a small fraction of what they do on killing to make sure my children everywhere have enough to drink and have food to eat. Help me. Please help me. Please help me. I have no one except you.’”

Now, I think that’s a ridiculous statement for a Christian to make, and I used Isaiah 50:2 to answer the question of God’s “arm being too short” to accomplish his will without our cooperation.  Sure, he expects obedience, and has chosen to work through us, but he doesn’t cry out like some weak, lonely old man that we would accomplish his dreams. 

In my recent flurry of Facebook activity, I also touched on the subject of the church’s care for the poor and widows, which according to most public opinion, should be without conditions.  The Bible says that widows must be chaste and dedicated to service in the church, or else the church shouldn’t provide for them (see 1 Timothy 5:9ff). The poor must work for their bread, not expect it as a right (see 2 Thessalonians 3:9-10).  (After this post, I was criticized for being stuck on the OT and its laws and regulations, and that Jesus came to teach us to love without condition.  Doh!)

Anyway, that should be enough to test the plugin.  Facebook is where the action is, at least until the election.  Then maybe I’ll start some real pontification again (hmmm, what name would I choose if I actually were the Pope? — that’d be real pontification, now, wouldn’t it?).

Biblical Lust

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

In this sex-charged world, you probably have in mind what this entry is going to be about.  But you’re wrong.  I’m going to talk a little bit about my temptation of “biblical lust” — that is the overwhelming compulsion to be taken by the design and substance of the book itself.  Not the contents, necessarily, but the book.

A little while ago, I pre-ordered the new ESV Study Bible from Amazon.  Expecting to see it sometime in early November, I was pleasantly suprised yesterday to hear the horn of the UPS driver (yes, he honks as he’s driving up — quite handy, actually), and to find a package from Amazon containing the Bible.

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